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NACCHO Applauds Release of Chicago’s New Public Health Agenda


 

Contact:
Becky Wexler
301-652-1558
bwexler@burnesscommunications.com

 
NACCHO Applauds Release of Chicago’s New Public Health Agenda
Plan embraced by stakeholders sets goals and priorities to improve health of all Chicagoans

Washington, DC (August 16, 2011)— The National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) commends Chicago leaders on today's release of their ambitious blueprint to make Chicago healthier. This morning, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Chicago Department of Public Health Commissioner Bechara Choucair released Healthy Chicago: A Public Health Agenda for a Healthy City, Healthy Neighborhoods, Healthy People and Healthy Homes, the first-ever comprehensive city-wide plan for public health in Chicago.

"Mayor Emanuel and Commissioner Choucair have created a bold, but realistic, action plan to make Chicago a healthier place to live, learn, work and play," said Robert M. Pestronk, NACCHO's executive director. "Healthy Chicago recognizes that collaboration is essential to improve community health."

Healthy Chicago identifies 12 priorities for action across the city, targeting health improvements such as lower rates of adult and childhood obesity; fewer teenage births; elimination of breast cancer disparities, reducing the spread of communicable, infectious, and sexually transmitted diseases, and even reducing the incidence of serious bullying among high school students. Each priority area calls for specific policies for the health department to pursue; programs and services for the health department to deliver; and education and public awareness efforts to reinforce these policies and programs.

To learn more about Healthy Chicago, visit the Chicago Department of Public Health Web site.

About the National Association of County and City Health Officials
The National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) represents the nation's 2,800 local governmental health departments. These city, county, metropolitan, district, and tribal departments work every day to protect and promote health and well-being for all people in their communities.

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